Pandemic Ponderings: It’s Okay To Float Along

I was previously working on a meandering post about all of the ridiculous items that W**h ads try to sell me (medical tools? cheese? drugs? impractical lingerie? blood worms?) until I realized that:

  1. My mom was getting similarly weird items advertised to her too— I guess I’m not a unique flower like I thought I was? (Or, if I am, I got it from my Momma!)
  2. I’m now pretty sure that is their strategy: get people sharing the wacky stuff to create a buzz to bring in more sales
  3. I don’t really want to promote a site that sells cheap knockoff junk of questionable quality
  4. It’s a fricken global pandemic right now and I just want to write something else.

Oh, one more little thing before I get into the post: my new domain is live! You can now access my blog at hidengoshauna.ca .

Neat, huh!?


So—pandemic time. How’s everyone doing?

Most of us are isolated in our homes just about 24/7 right now. It’s a strange time. I’ve seen a lot of posts urging people to make the best of this unforseen stretch of time to learn new skills, do the things they’ve been putting off, to not be idle and see this time as an opportunity.

To this I say great, if you can.

But not everybody can.

This message has been going around on social media: “If you don’t come out of this with a new skill, you never lacked time… you lacked discipline”. I call major bullshit on this one! This little bit of tough-love “wisdom” ignores the fact that people all live in vastly different situations with entirely different responsibilities, struggles, obstacles and means. To declare that this time should be an opportunity for skill development comes from a place of immense privilege and completely disregards the living experiences of others.

People are scared: for themselves, for loved ones, for the world at large. Some people are in isolation 24/7 with their abusers. Some people are facing racist attacks, unstable income, and falling into declining mental and physical health. Some people are looking after dependents who require round-the-clock care, and with their usual supports cut off suddenly.

Alaa Hijazi shared her insight as a trauma psychologist:

I feel lucky. I’m safe at home with my husband and dogs. I still have a job. My mental health is currently OK. My physical health is currently OK. I’m doing alright for now. I’m keeping busy and trying to make the best of my situation, but some times I have bad days and just float along as best as I can- and that’s okay.

I hope you are also doing alright, reader. Take care.